5 Copenhagen Brands That Could Become the Next Ganni

5 Copenhagen Brands That Could Become the Next Ganni

Fashionista | Alyssa Coscarelli

With the Danish fashion market gaining more and more traction with each season, we can’t help but question who will be next to step up to the plate.

No brand has broken out of Copenhagen quite as noticeably as Ganni. While many would argue that Copenhagen Fashion Week is climbing in the ranks of importance in the realm of lesser-known international fashion weeks, contemporary ready-to-wear label Ganni became a fashion-girl favorite for its candy-colored chunky knits and ditsy-floral prairie dresses long before anyone really had their sights set on CPH. Chances are, if you live in any of the U.S.’s major cities, you can find Ganni in your local indie boutique just as easily as you can on your favorite mass e-tailers online. And considering the brand is pretty ubiquitous on Instagram, we don’t even really exaggerate when we say: Ganni is everywhere. 

But with the Danish fashion market gaining more and more traction with each season, we can’t help but question who will be next to step up to the plate; which other Danish brands will step up to the global stage — or better yet, take over our Instagram feeds — in the same way Ganni has? Luckily, there’s no shortage of options, but there are a couple we’re betting on big-time. For their sustainability practices, justifiable pricepoints and Insta-worthy floral prints ready to rival those of good-old Ganni, these are a few of the labels who have potential to be the next-it Danish brand.

Stine Goya

Danish fashion can occasionally feel like a sea of sameness — we spotted countless New Balances and cocoon coats while there — but Stine Goya is willing to do just about anything to stand out. With party-ready tulle dresses, loud-in-a-good way prints, and intricate embellishments, it’s for those who want to be noticed (but don’t want to look like it took any effort). For its CPHFW presentation, the brand staged a dance performance to a single, live saxophone player, and in addition to twirling, the models stomped, giggled, hugged and deeply inhaled to create an attention-grabbing stage of the layered and printed Palazzo-inspired clothing in action. With these kinds of tricks up its sleeve, Stine Goya knows how to play to the Instagram generation, while still maintaining its unique approach. Talk about a breath of fresh air.

J Lindeberg

Tasked with taking a Scandinavian brand that was buzzy about 20 years ago and making it cool again, J Lindeberg’s young, new creative director Jens Werner (whose background includes Adidas, Y-3 and Tory Sport) often taps into the brand’s archives to hit a sweet spot between modern sportswear and late-nineties nostalgia. Sprinkled in with some sharp tailoring, unexpected fabrications and edgy collabs with his photographer-friends (most recently Susie J. Horgan), the brand offers a more digestible entry point to a Demna Gvasalia or Raf-at-Calvin aesthetic, and it’s certainly breathing new life into the brand, which is currently stocked in over 35 countries worldwide.

Munthe

Quickly creeping into the wardrobes of influencers like Anaa Saber and Stephanie Broek, Munthe‘s relaxed yet trend-heavy ready-to-wear is just as mix-and-match-able as Ganni’s easily layered looks. For context, a structured vest was layered over an oversized button-down and trackpants at the brand’s CPHFW show, and topped with a bucket hat, arguably any Ganni-girl’s staple of the season. But its sophisticated shirtdresses and elevated staples from trench coats to trousers let you layer it on without feeling like a kindergartener. It’s work-appropriate and easy to wear, but still just the right amount quirky.

Designers Remix

In the final-day frenzy of CPHFW, Designers Remix decided to take pause for a discussion about sustainability alongside its FW19 collection called “From Waste to Wardrobe.” Alongside looks made of recycled polyester, wool and cotton, Arizona Muse was the brand’s guest, there to discuss how her knowledge of sustainability has affected her as a consumer and what we can all do to keep fashion fun while still minimizing impact on the planet. The label is clearly blazing the trail for other Copenhagen brands to follow suit, giving itself a deadline of 2020 to find preferred sustainable fabrics for everything it produces, or the style is out. This is the kind of messaging that has potential to pick up major steam worldwide in a time when attention is shifting from fast fashion to more sustainable habits.

Holzweiler

 

It can be argued that part of Ganni’s success is due to its fresh styling across its e-commerce imagery, campaigns and the many fashion editors and bloggers who sport its styles online. If anyone is following suit in that capacity, it’s Holzweiler: This season, its show was styled by Alex Carl, who styled scarves and boilersuits in ways that left show goers taking mental notes to try at home. And as an aside, even though the runway show didn’t allow phones, the must-copy looks still found their way to Instagram after the fact. Consider that a stamp of approval

This article was written by Alyssa Coscarelli from Fashionista and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

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